10. Australian Cattle Dog

Source: Wikipedia

Yes, the Australian Cattle Dog from Down Under. This dog demands a high level of physical activity. Like many other herding dog breeds, the Cattle Dog has an active and fertile mind and if it is not given jobs to do it will find its own activities – which might not please the owner. It will appreciate a walk around the neighbourhood, but it needs structured activities that engage and challenge it, and regular interaction with its owner. While individual dogs have their own personalities and abilities, as a breed the Australian Cattle Dog is suited to any activity that calls for athleticism, intelligence, and endurance.

9. Rottweiler

Source: Wikipedia

The Rottweiler is a medium to large size breed of domestic dog that originated in Rottweil, Germany. The dogs were known as “Rottweil butchers’ dogs” (German: Rottweiler Metzgerhund) because they were used to herd livestock and pull carts laden with butchered meat and other products to market. Some records indicate that earlier Rottweilers may have also been used for hunting, although the modern Rottweiler has a relatively low hunting instinct.

The Rottweiler was employed in its traditional roles until the mid-19th century when railways replaced droving for getting livestock to market. While still used in herding, Rottweilers are now also used as search and rescue dogs, as guide dogs for the blind, as guard dogs or police dogs, and in other roles.

8. Papillon

Source: Wikipedia

The Papillon is a very intelligent dog that has a very easy time learning new tricks. This dog is great with kids, strangers, and other pets, but they should not be handled by young children as they are small and fragile and could be seriously injured. However, if a papillon grows up in isolation, it can tend to be slightly agressive towards other dogs. Papillons are also very playful and affectionate. Widely known as great companion dogs, with the spirit and energy to keep up with active families, but calm enough to be happy with sleeping in the arms of an equally affectionate owner. They have high energy level and require more exercise than the average companion breed.

7. Labrador Retriever

sophie

Labradors are an intelligent breed with a good work ethic and generally good temperaments (breed statistics show that 92.3% of Labradors who were tested passed the American Temperament Test.[40]) Common working roles for Labradors include: hunting, tracking and detection (they have a great sense of smell which helps when working in these areas), disabled-assistance, carting, and therapy work.[41] Approximately 60–70% of all guide dogs in Canada are Labradors; other common breeds are Golden Retrievers and German Shepherd Dogs.

Labradors are powerful and indefatigable swimmers noted for their ability to tolerate the coldest of water for extended periods of time. Their ability to work quietly alongside hunters while watching for birds to fall from the sky, marking where they land, and then using their outstanding nose to find and retrieve dead or wounded birds has made them the king of waterfowl retrievers. They are also used for pointing and flushing and make excellent upland game hunting partners.

The high intelligence, initiative and self-direction of Labradors in working roles is exemplified by dogs such as Endal, who during a 2001 emergency placed an unconscious human being in the recovery position, retrieved his mobile phone from beneath the car, fetched a blanket and covered him, barked at nearby dwellings for assistance, and then ran to a nearby hotel to obtain help. A number of Labradors have also been taught to assist their owner in removing money and credit cards from ATMs with prior training.

6. Shetland Sheepdog

Sheltie

Source: Wikipedia

The Shetland sheepdog is lively, intelligent, playful, trainable, and willing to please and obey. They are loving, loyal, and affectionate with their family, but are naturally aloof with strangers; for this reason Shelties must be socialized. The Shetland Sheepdog Standard from the AKC allows them to be reserved to strangers, but they should not show fear. Shelties do well with children if they are reared with them from an early age; however, their small size makes it easy for a child to accidentally injure them, so supervision is necessary.

Shelties are vocal dogs, and are very alert to outside stimuli. The average Sheltie is an excellent watch dog. The herding instinct is strong in many Shelties. They love to chase and herd things, including squirrels, ducks, children, and if an owner is not watchful, cars. Shelties love to run in wide-open areas. Some Shelties get so excited or anxious that they perform a fast series of tight spins without chasing their tails, a behavior unique to the breed.

5. Doberman Pinscher

doberman

Source: Wikipedia

Although they are considered to be working dogs, Doberman Pinschers are often stereotyped as being ferocious and aggressive. As a personal protection dog, the Doberman was originally bred for these traits: it had to be large and intimidating, fearless, and willing to defend its owner, but sufficiently obedient and restrained to only do so on command. These traits served the dog well in its role as a personal defense dog, police dog, or war dog, but were not ideally adapted to a companionship role. In recent decades, the Doberman Pinscher’s size, short coat, and intelligence made it a desirable house dog. Their aggression has been toned down by modern breeders over the years, and today’s Dobermans are known for a much more even and good natured temperament, extreme loyalty, high intelligence, and great trainability.

4. Golden Retriever

golden retriever
Golden Retrievers are exceptionally trainable—due to their intelligence, athleticism and desire to please their handlers—and generally excel in obedience trials. They are also very competitive in agility and other performance events. Harsh training methods are unnecessary as Golden Retrievers often respond very well to positive and upbeat training styles.

Golden Retrievers are compatible with children and adults and are good with other dogs, cats and most livestock. Golden Retrievers are particularly valued for their high level of sociability towards people, calmness, and willingness to learn. Because of this, they are commonly used as guide dogs, mobility assistance dogs, and search and rescue dogs. They are friendly and tend to learn tricks easily.

3. German Shepherd

German Shepherd

Source: Wikipedia

German Shepherds are a very popular selection for use as working dogs. They are especially well known for their police work, being used for tracking criminals, patrolling troubled areas, and detection and holding of suspects. Additionally thousands of German Shepherds have been used by the military. Usually trained for scout duty, they are used to warn soldiers to the presence of enemies or of booby traps or other hazards. German Shepherds have also been trained by military groups to parachute from aircraft.

The German Shepherd Dog is one of the most widely used breeds in a wide variety of scent-work roles. These include search and rescue, cadaver searching, narcotics detection, explosives detection, accelerant detection, and mine detection dog, among others. They are suited for these lines of work because of their keen sense of smell and their ability to work regardless of distractions.

2. Poodle

poodle
This breed’s keen sense for instinctive behavior. In particular, marking and hunting drives are more readily observable than in most other breeds. Even Toys will point birds. Classified as highly energetic, Poodles can also get bored fairly easily, and have been known to get creative about finding mischief. Poodles like to be in the center of things and are easily trained to do astonishing tricks involving both brains and agility. They have performed in circuses for centuries, beginning in Europe, and have been part of the Ringling Circus in its various forms from its inception. The Grimaldis, the famous British clowns Kenneth and Audrey Austin, “developed a stronger circus act” with a clever Poodle named ‘Twinkle’.

1. Border Collie
Border Collie
The Border Collie is an intelligent breed; in fact, it is widely considered to be one of the most intelligent dog breeds. Although the primary role of the Border Collie is that of the working stock dog, dogs of this breed are becoming increasingly popular as pets.

True to their working heritage, Border Collies make very demanding, energetic pets that are better off in households that can provide them with plenty of play and exercise with humans or other dogs. Due to their demanding personalities and need for mental stimulation and exercise, many border collies develop neurotic behaviors in households that are not able to provide for their needs. They are infamous for chewing holes in walls, biting and chewing on furniture such as chairs and table legs and digging holes out of boredom. As a result, an alarming number of border collies end up in shelters and rescues every year. One of the prime reasons for getting rid of a border collie is their unsuitability for families with small children, cats, and other dogs, due to their intense desire to herd; this was bred into them for hundreds of years and still one of their chief uses outside the household.

Border Collies are now also being used in showing, especially agility, where their speed and agility comes to good use.

References:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Intelligence_of_DogsCoren, Stanley

Coren,Stanley.(2006)Why does my dog act that way? A complete guide to your dog’s personality. (Free Press, 2006)

Comments

comments